Alan's Blog

Where is Tropicana Field??

This is the worst multi purpose stadium in baseball... well wait.. what about Oakland?

Tropicana Field
Venue: Tropicana Field

The Trop in St. Pete!

Here we go again... This time I was a local!

Fun with Ana.

Nationals Ballpark
Venue: Nationals Ballpark

Nationals Park is the current ballpark for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball. It is the first LEED-certified green major professional sports stadium in the United States.[11] The facility hosted the 2008 season's first game (in North America), when the Nats took on the Atlanta Braves on March 30, 2008. The first game played there was a collegiate baseball game. The stadium is located along the Anacostia River in the Navy Yard neighborhood of Washington, D.C., and replaced RFK Stadium as the Nationals' home ballpark.

Metro Series!

Part of the 3 games in 2 days trip.

Nationals Ballpark
Venue: Nationals Ballpark

Nationals Park is the current ballpark for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball. It is the first LEED-certified green major professional sports stadium in the United States.[11] The facility hosted the 2008 season's first game (in North America), when the Nats took on the Atlanta Braves on March 30, 2008. The first game played there was a collegiate baseball game. The stadium is located along the Anacostia River in the Navy Yard neighborhood of Washington, D.C., and replaced RFK Stadium as the Nationals' home ballpark.

Mark Buherle had arrived!

My first trip to Comerica Park

Comerica Park
Venue: Comerica Park

Comerica Park opened in 2000 and is newer than all the stadiums in the American League Central other than Target Field. The stadium replaced Tiger Stadium / Briggs Stadium / Navin Field which was on the corner of Michigan and Trumbell a short distance away from the new park. Comerica Park sits next to Ford Field (NFL) and other Detroit mainstays such as the Opera House, Hockeytown and the Fox Theatre.

$2 Upper Deck Thursday!

$2. That's all we paid for tickets!

Oakland Coliseum
Venue: Oakland Coliseum

You're in Oakland!

Los Angeles: The better half!

This is LA. The better half!

Angels Stadium
Venue: Angels Stadium

Angel Stadium has been the home of the Angels since their move from Los Angeles. In 1964, ground was broken for Anaheim Stadium and in 1966, the then-California Angels moved into their new home after having spent four seasons renting Dodger Stadium (referred to during Angels games as Chávez Ravine Stadium) from the Dodgers. The stadium was built on a parcel of about 160 acres (0.65 km2) of flat land originally used for agricultural purposes in the southeast portion of Anaheim. Consistent with many major-league sports stadiums built in the 1960s, it is located in a suburban area, though one that is host to major tourist attractions. The field dimensions (333 feet instead of 330, for example) were derived from a scientific study conducted by the Angels. Based on the air density at normal game times (1:30 pm and 8 pm), the Angels tried to formulate dimensions that were fairly balanced between pitcher, hitter and average weather conditions. The Angels tinkered with those dimensions several times, expanding or contracting parts of the outfield by a few feet here and there, to try to refine that balance. None of this seemed to matter to their Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan, who threw two of his record seven no-hitters in this ballpark, and racked up 2,416 of his 5,714 career strikeouts in eight seasons with the Angels (Ryan stats from The Sporting News Baseball Record Book). One of the no-hitters, on June 1, 1975, was his fourth, which tied Sandy Koufax's career record, one Ryan would eventually supplant.

Road Trip 2009.. The final encounter!

And now.. for the 800 mile drive to Seattle!

Safeco Field
Venue: Safeco Field

Coffee Anyone?

We started in Arlington... Then did 4 more games!

It was hot! Then we went to OKC!

The Ballpark in Arlington
Venue: The Ballpark in Arlington

Rangers Ballpark in Arlington is a ballpark in Arlington, Texas, located between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. It was known until May 7, 2004, as The Ballpark in Arlington when Ameriquest bought the naming rights to the ballpark and renamed it Ameriquest Field in Arlington. On March 19, 2007, the Texas Rangers severed their relationship with Ameriquest and announced that the stadium would be named Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. The stadium was constructed as a replacement for nearby Arlington Stadium. It is home to the American League's Texas Rangers, and the Texas Rangers Baseball Hall of Fame. The stadium contains 5,704 club seats and 126 luxury suites.

The end of a very long trip...

US Cellular Field
Venue: US Cellular Field

NFL Draft Weekend 2009, Replica Jersey Day...

Saturday was nuts... Sunday was empty...

Kauffman Stadium
Venue: Kauffman Stadium

This is the template for Kauffman Stadium

Miller Park... So much to say....

We had such high hopes....

Miller Park
Venue: Miller Park

A great new park... in Minneapolis!

It was NFL draft weekend... But we started with some baseball!

Target Field
Venue: Target Field

Sure, I'll do one more!

Dusty, Kenny and Alan went to the O's vs Nationals Game!

Nationals Ballpark
Venue: Nationals Ballpark

Nationals Park is the current ballpark for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball. It is the first LEED-certified green major professional sports stadium in the United States.[11] The facility hosted the 2008 season's first game (in North America), when the Nats took on the Atlanta Braves on March 30, 2008. The first game played there was a collegiate baseball game. The stadium is located along the Anacostia River in the Navy Yard neighborhood of Washington, D.C., and replaced RFK Stadium as the Nationals' home ballpark.

A sad day... but it should have been different.

It was Ernie Harwell day.

Comerica Park
Venue: Comerica Park

Comerica Park opened in 2000 and is newer than all the stadiums in the American League Central other than Target Field. The stadium replaced Tiger Stadium / Briggs Stadium / Navin Field which was on the corner of Michigan and Trumbell a short distance away from the new park. Comerica Park sits next to Ford Field (NFL) and other Detroit mainstays such as the Opera House, Hockeytown and the Fox Theatre.

Dave called and said meet me in Cleveland!

The phone rang and it was Dave!

Progressive Field
Venue: Progressive Field

Progressive Field is a ballpark located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, and is the home of the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball and the American League. Along with Quicken Loans Arena, it is part of the Gateway Sports and Entertainment Complex. It was ranked as Major League Baseball's best ballpark in a 2008 Sports Illustrated fan opinion poll.[7] From its inaugural season in 1994, the ballpark was named Jacobs Field for team owners Richard and David Jacobs, until 2008, when it was changed to Progressive Field due to the sale of naming rights to the Progressive Insurance Company. Fans informally refer to it as The Jake (based on the park's original name) as well as The Pro or The Prog (short for Progressive). The ballpark contains 2,064 club seats and 126 luxury suites.

I was late... Due to a flight delay!

I flew in from Raleigh NC!

Progressive Field
Venue: Progressive Field

Progressive Field is a ballpark located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, and is the home of the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball and the American League. Along with Quicken Loans Arena, it is part of the Gateway Sports and Entertainment Complex. It was ranked as Major League Baseball's best ballpark in a 2008 Sports Illustrated fan opinion poll.[7] From its inaugural season in 1994, the ballpark was named Jacobs Field for team owners Richard and David Jacobs, until 2008, when it was changed to Progressive Field due to the sale of naming rights to the Progressive Insurance Company. Fans informally refer to it as The Jake (based on the park's original name) as well as The Pro or The Prog (short for Progressive). The ballpark contains 2,064 club seats and 126 luxury suites.

Before it was "The Prog"

It rained at it rained and it rained!

Progressive Field
Venue: Progressive Field

Progressive Field is a ballpark located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, and is the home of the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball and the American League. Along with Quicken Loans Arena, it is part of the Gateway Sports and Entertainment Complex. It was ranked as Major League Baseball's best ballpark in a 2008 Sports Illustrated fan opinion poll.[7] From its inaugural season in 1994, the ballpark was named Jacobs Field for team owners Richard and David Jacobs, until 2008, when it was changed to Progressive Field due to the sale of naming rights to the Progressive Insurance Company. Fans informally refer to it as The Jake (based on the park's original name) as well as The Pro or The Prog (short for Progressive). The ballpark contains 2,064 club seats and 126 luxury suites.

Before it was Rogers Centre

Its Canada baby!

Rogers Centre
Venue: Rogers Centre

The idea for building an enclosed sports venue came following the Grey Cup game in November 1982, held at the outdoor Exhibition Stadium. The game was plagued by terrible weather that affected the patrons, who were viewing from stands that were not sheltered. Thousands spent most of the game in the concession section of the stadium, the crowd was drenched, and the washrooms were overflowing, which was on the whole a bad experience for the fans. In attendance that day was then-Ontario Premier Bill Davis, and the poor conditions were seen by over 7,862,000 television viewers in Canada (at the time the largest TV audience ever in Canada).[10] The following day, at a rally at Toronto City Hall, tens of thousands of people who were there to see the Toronto Argonauts began to chant, "We want a dome! We want a dome!" So too did others who began to discuss the possibility of an all-purpose, all-weather stadium. Seven months later, in June 1983, Premier Davis formally announced that a three-person committee would look into the feasibility of building a domed stadium at Exhibition Place. The committee consisted of Paul Godfrey, Larry Grossman and former Ontario Hydro chairman Hugh Macaulay.[11] Over the next few years various tangible projects emerged, including a large indoor stadium at Exhibition Place with an air-supported dome, similar to BC Place in Vancouver. In 1985, an international design competition was launched to design a new stadium, along with selection of a site for the stadium. Some of the proposed sites included Exhibition Place, Downsview Airport, and York University. The final site was located at the base of the CN Tower not far from Union Station, a major railway and transit hub. The land was a major Canadian National Railway rail switching yard encompassing the CNR Spadina Roundhouse (the desolate downtown lands were part of a master plan for revitalizing the area which includes CityPlace). The price would be $150 million. Ultimately the Robbie/Allen concept won because it provided the largest roof opening of all the finalists, and it was the most technically sound.

Easter Weekend Fun

First time with Dave. Just after we met

Oriole Park at Camden Yards
Venue: Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Oriole Park at Camden Yards is a Major League Baseball ballpark located in Baltimore, Maryland. Home field of the Baltimore Orioles, it is the first of the "retro" major league ballparks constructed during the 1990s and early 2000s, and remains one of the most highly praised. The park was completed in 1992 to replace Memorial Stadium. It is situated in downtown Baltimore a few blocks west of the Inner Harbor in the Camden Yards Sports Complex. Historically, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is one of several venues that have carried the "Oriole Park" name for various Baltimore franchises over the years. The park is typically known simply as "Camden Yards."

Camden Again!

The Return to Camden with Dave.

Oriole Park at Camden Yards
Venue: Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Oriole Park at Camden Yards is a Major League Baseball ballpark located in Baltimore, Maryland. Home field of the Baltimore Orioles, it is the first of the "retro" major league ballparks constructed during the 1990s and early 2000s, and remains one of the most highly praised. The park was completed in 1992 to replace Memorial Stadium. It is situated in downtown Baltimore a few blocks west of the Inner Harbor in the Camden Yards Sports Complex. Historically, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is one of several venues that have carried the "Oriole Park" name for various Baltimore franchises over the years. The park is typically known simply as "Camden Yards."

Camden? Camden! CAMDEN!

Camden 2005

Oriole Park at Camden Yards
Venue: Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Oriole Park at Camden Yards is a Major League Baseball ballpark located in Baltimore, Maryland. Home field of the Baltimore Orioles, it is the first of the "retro" major league ballparks constructed during the 1990s and early 2000s, and remains one of the most highly praised. The park was completed in 1992 to replace Memorial Stadium. It is situated in downtown Baltimore a few blocks west of the Inner Harbor in the Camden Yards Sports Complex. Historically, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is one of several venues that have carried the "Oriole Park" name for various Baltimore franchises over the years. The park is typically known simply as "Camden Yards."

Take the guys to Fenway

Took Dave to Fenway. This was my second time while being his first!

Fenway Park
Venue: Fenway Park

Fenway Park is a baseball park near Kenmore Square in Boston, Massachusetts. Located at 4 Yawkey Way, it has served as the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox baseball club since it opened in 1912, and is the oldest Major League Baseball stadium currently in use. It is one of two "classic" ballparks still in use, the other being Chicago's Wrigley Field. Considered to be one of the best-known sports venues in the world, it has been the oldest venue used by a professional sports team in the United States since the 1991 demolition of Comiskey Park in Chicago. Because of the ballpark's age and constrained location in the dense Fenway–Kenmore neighborhood, the park has had many renovations and additions over the years not initially envisioned, resulting in unique, quirky features, including "The Triangle," "Pesky's Pole", and most notably the famous Green Monster in left field. Dedicated Red Sox fans have sold out every Red Sox home game since May 15, 2003; in 2008, the park sold out its 456th consecutive Red Sox game, breaking a Major League Baseball record. Fans who attended this game received gifts to celebrate this accomplishment. As of March 30, 2011, the Red Sox have had 631 consecutive sellouts, which is easily the best in Major League Baseball history.[5] The sellout streak is aided by the Red Sox's fan base as well as the fact that, as of 2011, Fenway Park has the third lowest maximum capacity of any MLB stadium; it is one of the seven MLB ballparks that cannot accommodate at least 40,000 spectators.

Curse of the Bambino!

Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston... Boston...

Fenway Park
Venue: Fenway Park

Fenway Park is a baseball park near Kenmore Square in Boston, Massachusetts. Located at 4 Yawkey Way, it has served as the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox baseball club since it opened in 1912, and is the oldest Major League Baseball stadium currently in use. It is one of two "classic" ballparks still in use, the other being Chicago's Wrigley Field. Considered to be one of the best-known sports venues in the world, it has been the oldest venue used by a professional sports team in the United States since the 1991 demolition of Comiskey Park in Chicago. Because of the ballpark's age and constrained location in the dense Fenway–Kenmore neighborhood, the park has had many renovations and additions over the years not initially envisioned, resulting in unique, quirky features, including "The Triangle," "Pesky's Pole", and most notably the famous Green Monster in left field. Dedicated Red Sox fans have sold out every Red Sox home game since May 15, 2003; in 2008, the park sold out its 456th consecutive Red Sox game, breaking a Major League Baseball record. Fans who attended this game received gifts to celebrate this accomplishment. As of March 30, 2011, the Red Sox have had 631 consecutive sellouts, which is easily the best in Major League Baseball history.[5] The sellout streak is aided by the Red Sox's fan base as well as the fact that, as of 2011, Fenway Park has the third lowest maximum capacity of any MLB stadium; it is one of the seven MLB ballparks that cannot accommodate at least 40,000 spectators.

Great American Ballpark

I'm a great american!

Great American Ballpark
Venue: Great American Ballpark

Great American Ball Park is a baseball venue located in Cincinnati, Ohio. It is the home field of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB). It opened in 2003, replacing Cinergy Field (formerly Riverfront Stadium), which had been their home field from June 1970 to 2002. Despite the patriotic tone of the name, the park's name comes from the Great American Insurance Group, which purchased the park's naming rights. Carl Lindner, Jr., the late chairman of Great American Insurance Group's parent company, American Financial Group, was the majority owner of the Cincinnati Reds from 1999 to 2005.

Bailout Ballpark

If the government builds it.. you shall come...

Venue: Citi Field

New York Mets

Another Beer Stadium

It's all about Busch!

Busch Stadium
Venue: Busch Stadium

Synopsis

They Wrecked It!!!!

Post renovation they destroyed what used to be a quirky park. Now its full of ATM's!

Chase Field
Venue: Chase Field

Rocky Mountain High!

There are 3 stadiums named after beer and this one is by far the best!

Coors Field
Venue: Coors Field

Best Park in the NL!

It was finally time to go to Wrigley Field.

Wrigley Field
Venue: Wrigley Field

Home Sweet Home

This is my home park. I have been here since the park opened in 2000 seemingly at least once a year. As a first blog about Comerica Park I will tell you about my experience in 2005 which was game seven of an eight game road trip. Being home was nice and looking back specifically at the road trip it should have ended here. Either we should have started in Toronto and ended in Detroit or simply had a seven game trip rather than eight. I remember in May of 2005 that the game was really cold. Patrick in fact didn't have long sleeves with him and ended up with one of mom's sweatshirts to survive the overcast day. It was overcast in Cleveland the day before and the next day in Chicago was really no different either. The 2005 Detroit Tigers team left something to be desired. Players like Justin Verlander, Joel Zumaya and Curtis Granderson wouldn't join the team full time until 2006 and the fans didn't turn out that day.

Comerica Park
Venue: Comerica Park

Comerica Park opened in 2000 and is newer than all the stadiums in the American League Central other than Target Field. The stadium replaced Tiger Stadium / Briggs Stadium / Navin Field which was on the corner of Michigan and Trumbell a short distance away from the new park. Comerica Park sits next to Ford Field (NFL) and other Detroit mainstays such as the Opera House, Hockeytown and the Fox Theatre.